Flight: Spain: 1 of 2 – Length of the Pyrenees

Although this was one day of flying, I decided to break up the outbound and returning leg of the flight into two blog posts, as I ended up taking almost 5000 photographs, and there is just too much to show. That is a record for one flight. While I don’t per se keep track, I definitely smashed the crap out of any prior flying day by a wide margin with the image count.

The way out is straight west, flying the length of the Pre-Pyrenees. The next post will be the same leg coming back, except over the spine of the Pyrenees – nearly the entire length of the mountain chain.

The Pre-Pyrenees are interesting in that they are not exactly foothills, as the terrain can exceed timberline, yet the rock features are immensely varied, with all sorts of interesting things going on. The Pyrenees themselves are as one would expect: big ass mountains.

The terrain contained things that reminded me of Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Appalachia, New York, farm country, hill country, scrub brush, snow, thick pines, and everything in between. I was like a kid in a candy store and my arm literally got tired holding the camera and my hand fatigued from pressing the shutter button. With 548GB of camera cards and 11TB of hard drive space, I am awaiting the arrival of my new computer, as the current one is ready to start on fire when I start retouching photos. Too many pictures….

Map of flight out and back. Outbound leg (this blog post) is bottom half of the white line. Yellow line is border of Spain and France (France north, Spain south for the geographically ignorant).
Map

Inversion – though it will not be affecting this flight!

Pre Pyrenees (1 of 38)

Serra de Boumort
Pre Pyrenees (2 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (3 of 38)

Collegats-Queralt
Pre Pyrenees (4 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (5 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (6 of 38)

Embassament de Sant Antoni
Pre Pyrenees (7 of 38)

Vall Alta de Serradell-Terreta-Serra de Sant GervàsPre Pyrenees (8 of 38)

Muntanya d’Adons
Pre Pyrenees (9 of 38)

Vertical rock is a very nice thing to see in an airplane.
Pre Pyrenees (10 of 38)

More or less the border of Aragón and Catalunya. Més o menys la frontera de Catalunya i Aragón. Hey, imagine that….Catalan! Más o menos la frontera de Cataluña y Aragón. Spanish too!
Pre Pyrenees (11 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (12 of 38)

Unnamed terrain. Closest village is El Sas.
Pre Pyrenees (13 of 38)

Apparently terrain like this is so common, it has no name. Closest village complexes all end in Serradúy….
Pre Pyrenees (14 of 38)

Highway HU-V-9601.
Pre Pyrenees (15 of 38)

Turbón
Pre Pyrenees (16 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (17 of 38)

Collado de el Santo. 
Pre Pyrenees (18 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (19 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (20 of 38)

Peña Montañesa
Pre Pyrenees (21 of 38)

More vertical rock!
Pre Pyrenees (22 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (23 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (24 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (25 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (26 of 38)

It is getting exhausting figuring out the names for these things (that, and in an Aragonese symbol of not giving a crap, the hills stop having a name on Google Maps). These are between the last named mountain and Jaca.
Pre Pyrenees (27 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (28 of 38)

There are three churches at timberline on this hill, all duly named after some long dead saintly figures, yet nobody can bother to name the mountain itself? 
Pre Pyrenees (29 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (30 of 38)

East of Sabiñanigo, looking east toward where I came.
Pre Pyrenees (31 of 38)

West of Sabiñanigo, looking toward Santa Cilia airport.
Pre Pyrenees (32 of 38)

There is a terrain feature like this in southwest Virginia, deep in hillbilly Appalachian coal country. I really don’t know what to say as the comparison is unmistakable yet I have no desire to defile Spain with the Confederacy….
Pre Pyrenees (33 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (34 of 38) Pre Pyrenees (35 of 38)

What the hell is this? 
Pre Pyrenees (36 of 38)

Jaca
Pre Pyrenees (37 of 38)

West of Jaca, just before the airport.
Pre Pyrenees (38 of 38)

I heard some strange noises coming from behind the fueling station at the airport. I walked back to find out that chickens live there. If one wishes to understand why Mexico and all of Latin America is the way it is, may I suggest non-Catalonian Spain as an explanation?
Chickens - 1 (1)